Last Chances for Tour Glory

Today is the last day in the Pyrenees. A killer 200km stage with the climbs of the Aspin, the Tourmalet and the Aubisque, racking up 4,800M of climbing. In theory all Geraint Thomas has to do is sit on the wheel of Tom Dumoulin to seal victory – it’s virtually impossible to see anyone else bursting into the picture, and it’s equally unlikely that Dumoulin will be able to beat Thomas by the 2 minutes he trails by in tomorrow’s 31km time trial. So, the affable Welshman is all set to become GB’s 3rd TdF winner, finally able to receive the plaudits after nearly 3 weeks of media speculation as to whether it was him or Froome who was leading Sky, even though Thomas was leading the race.

Will Grellier hold onto Narrow Advantage?

The situation in the Armchairtifosi.com Intermediate Sprints Competition is similarly poised. Fabien Grellier holds a 1 pt advantage over Direct Energie team-mate Sylvain Chavanel going into today’s stage – the halfway point will be somewhere up the slopes of the Tourmalet, so the break (possibly with the obligatory Direct Energie member) may still be clear. There will be no points for the T.T., so there will only be Sunday’s jaunt to Paris (with points awarded on one of the passages de ligne on the Champs Elysee). Direct Energie have all but settled the team competition – mathematically Fortuneo or Wanty could still win, but they will need to bag maximum points on both days to overhaul the leaders.

Crashes, Protesting Farmers and Tear-Gas – all in a day’s work for the Peloton

Tuesday’s stage which wound its way into the Pyrenees from Carcassonne was notable for the crashes of Philippe Gilbert and Adam Yates while leading, another stage win for the swashbuckling Julian Alaphilippe, a total stalemate amongst the GC hopes and the annual protest by French farmers, this year enlivened by the indiscriminate use of tear gas. Gilbert (who finished the stage with a cracked patella), Yates and Alaphilippe had all been part of a huge group that had built an unassailable lead and fought out the official (and Armchair) intermediate sprint at Saint-Girons, with Cofidis’s Christophe Laporte gaining his team’s 1st points since the Vendee, ahead of Edvald Boasson-Hagen and former yellow jersey wearer, Greg van Avermaet.

A Short, Sharp, Shock in the Pyrenees

Wednesday saw the “short, sharp shock” of the 65km mountain stage that culminated with the climb of the Col de Portet, Quintana’s long-range attack, Dan Martin’s gallant efforts to chase him down and the eventual eclipse of Chris Froome as Thomas made more gains. It also featured my moment of the race as Julian Alaphilippe, who was dropping back from the lead, passed a similarly toiling Adam Yates and patted him on the back – it had been Alaphilippe who had ridden past the sprawling Yates on the downhill run to Tuesday’s finish, and he had looked to slow up to see if his rival was going to get back onto his wheel. Alaphilippe had picked up a couple of “Armchair” points at the halfway mark, behind Team UAE’s Croatian Kristjan Durasek, and just ahead of Astana’s Estonian super-domestique Tanel Kangert, shortly before he struck out on a lone bid for glory.

Boudat Becomes 6th Direct Energie Rider to Collect Points

Yesterday was a day off for the GC men and a chance for the sprinters who had survived the mountains to go for glory in Pau – victory went to Arnaud Demare, recording only his 3rd win of the year, but as the previous wins were stages of the Tour de Suisse and the Paris-Nice, he clearly goes well on the big days (he’s also a winner of the Milan – San Remo). A group of 5 riders had gone clear early, maximising TV coverage for their sponsors and fighting out the Armchairtifosi points at the sleepy town of Aire-sur-Ardor before being swallowed up by the peloton.  Victory went to Wanty’s Guillaume van Keirsbulck (moving up to 4 pts) ahead of Thomas Boudat, a 6th individual points scorer from Direct Energie’s 8 man team, and Aussie veteran and former Paris-Roubaix hero Matt Heyman (Mitchelton-Scott) who kept fellow Monument winner Niki Terpstra out of the points.

A bad Weekend to go on Holiday

Dear readers, wherever you are, you will have to wait until next week before finding out the final winner of my competition as I am off to Amsterdam for the weekend and will have to record Sunday’s stage. This is the 2nd year running that I have gone on holiday for the last weekend of the Tour – last year I rented a villa in the south of France; when we arrived the owner was there, watching the Marseilles TT on TV – I should point out to Dave Brailsford that this friendly Frenchman did not feel the need to throw cups of urine at the screen whenever the cameras showed Chris Froome’s efforts.

Author: armchairtifosi

A lifelong fan of cycling and a keen, if slow and underachieving, cyclist. I grew up watching Eddy Merckx on World of Sport and still believe he was the best. It's not enough to win. you have to win in style, and preferably in plain black shorts and short white socks.

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